See which charter schools in your state double-dipped in coronavirus aid

Welcome to Cashing in on Kids, a newsletter for people fighting to stop the privatization of America’s public schools—produced by In the Public Interest.

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See what charter schools in your state double-dipped in coronavirus aid. The Network for Public Education scoured the list of Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) recipients recently disclosed by the Small Business Administration. They found that more than 1,300 charter schools and their nonprofit or for-profit management companies secured between $925 million and $2.2 billion in PPP loans—while also still receiving funding meant for public schools. Here’s their list by state. The Washington Post

In the Public Interest and Parents United for Public Education created a searchable database of California charter organizations that received PPP funding. In the Public Interest

Kansas City Public Schools “got zilch.” Kansas City charter and private schools got millions from the federal Paycheck Protection Program. Meanwhile, Gov. Mike Parson cut $131 million from school budgets last month. The Kansas City Star

Nepotism in New Orleans. The Louisiana Board of Ethics has charged two Better Choice Foundation board members and two former employees of the school it ran—Mary D. Coghill Charter School—for allegedly violating a state law prohibiting agency heads or members of school boards from employing close family members. The Lens

Three upcoming webinars. On July 29, join the Chicago Teachers Union and others for “Racism is a Public Health Crisis.” Haymarket Books

On August 6, join Public Funds Public Schools for a discussion with Steve Suitts about his new book Overturning Brown: The Segregationist Legacy of the Modern School Choice Movement. Public Funds Public Schools

And on August 21, join Rethinking Schools and Teaching for Change for “Teaching for Black Lives During the Rebellion,” with Dyan Watson, Jesse Hagopian, Wayne Au, and Cierra Kaler-JonesRethinking Schools