Other Web Resources

ITPI Privatization Resource Guide

The resources in this resource guide are produced by ITPI, members of the ITPI Scholars Network and other close allies. The publications are intended to provide educational information and inform winning campaigns to ensure that public services and assets are publicly controlled and contracts with private entities are transparent, accountable, effectively monitored, and that those contracts meet the long-term needs of communities.

The Cost of Private Prisons

The private prison industry claims that governments can save money by privatizing prisons, but what does the evidence actually indicate? This backgrounder summarizes recent research and state reports related to private prison costs, and then discusses some common, yet dangerously flawed and unsound tactics employed to make private prisons appear cost effective.

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Infrastructure Justice: Building Equity into Infrastructure Financing

Public funding of infrastructure is well known to be the least expensive way to finance major infrastructure projects. But in light of the pressure governments face to aggressively pursue private funds for public infrastructure, we believe it is critical to clarify our goals and principles so that Public-Private Partnerships are truly structured as win-win-win propositions.

Making the Grade? Questions to Ask About School Services Privatization

This guide provides examples of important questions that decision makers should consider when faced with a proposed privatization effort. Advocates, including school service personnel, teachers, parents, and members of the community can use these questions to ensure that decision makers keep students’ and the broader district’s best interest at the heart of these conversations. They should be able to answer each of these questions before making the decision to privatize school services. These questions can be helpful to use during meetings with school administrators, in testimony at school board hearings, and even in meetings with allies to draw attention to problems with a proposed privatization initiative. While this is not a complete or exhaustive guide, it provides a framework for examining and evaluating school services privatization.